A Family Media Collection?..

The Digital Revolution

Photo CDs
Photo CDs

The start of the digital era

DVDs
DVDs

Stack of DVDs

Card Reader
Card Reader

Card reader & various sd cards

Canon PowerShot
Canon PowerShot

Very popular digital camera

Today"s Electronics
Today"s Electronics

Modern digital device collection

Cloud-Storage
Cloud-Storage

Central Storage

Programs
Programs

To organize digital media

Software
Software

To manipulate digital media

 The Good of the Digital...  

 

The Digital Era  provides us with amazing  capabilities to capture and record everyday moments and events, with no restrictions on storage and retrieval. We can take thousands of pictures & videos, across a multitude devices, with little thought about capacity. The technology is continually improving with better resolution photos and video, larger file transfer and  LIMITLESS storage in THE CLOUD,  with the promise of access to our data, uncorrupted FOREVER.  It  gives us the tools  to save and view all of our information from anywhere, and there are so many useful apps to make media editing and other everyday tasks  much easier to do. 

So what's the problem? ....

 

The problem is that with  these rapid advancements,  some"new" technologies are also  rapidly becoming  obsolete.  Digital cameras have already been largely replaced by smartphones. The photos we took with them  may  be scattered  over a variety of SSD drives, USB flash drives, SD cards  and scandisks.

 

While CDs & DVDs are considered "digital", they are rapidly becoming obsolete.  CDs  are  "vintage", and  not safe media storage options as they can easily become scratched & corrupted.   DVDs are being replaced by Streaming services and  have formats that are not editable. Even digital image formats are changing. Your phone pictures could now have a .heic  file extension instead of the "universal"  .jpeg.

With the ease of taking unlimited numbers of  quality photographs & videos on our smartphones,  that can be immediately backed up in the Cloud, it is not unusual for people to take thousands of photos every year.  Our  digital collections are becoming vast, and spread across different devices and storage media , remotely in the cloud,  and on photo storage and social media sites. 

Why does it matter?

Selecting items to include in a digital Family Story Collection is very  challenging if you have to  sift/swipe  through reams of  data, and that is even before adding  in  digitized ANALOG things.  It becomes much easier when everything is digital and located in  one place, sorted by time period, events and people. 

 

What Is Analog Media?

Vintage Photos
Vintage Photos

Loose Vintage Family Photos

Vintage Album
Vintage Album

Vintage Family Album & loose photos

Film Reel
Film Reel

What old movies were recorded on

Old Film Projector
Old Film Projector

How to watch old movies

Slides
Slides
Roll Film
Roll Film
Shoebox of old photos
Shoebox of old photos

Shoebox of old photos

Old photo collection
Old photo collection

Different storage options

Old Cameras
Old Cameras

Selection of old cameras

Videos
Videos

Camcorders & video cassette tapes

Magnetic Album
Magnetic Album
Photo Albums
Photo Albums

Photo Album Library

Digital Photography took-off in the early 2000’s (CD with photos)  with the introduction of digital cameras and solid state storage media.  Before that we recorded  our memories on various types of "film"  (think negatives, slides, home movies and videos).  Our, at least 20 year and older, analog collections can already be quite  sizable.  They  may include such gems  as grandma's  vintage albums & other fragile memorabilia,  movie film in their original metal cans, various videos (VHS & cassettes)  and  old photographs glued into scrapbooks, stored in photo albums or stuffed in old shoe boxes.

 

What are the Issues?

 

The problem with old media is that it is very susceptible to deterioration. Sunlight, heat and humidity can be particularly  damaging.  Paper can get torn and stained, very old paper can even crumble and ink will fade.  Photographs can be stained from fingerprints, and solvents.  They can  get folded, creased, or torn,  scratched and speckled with dust and debris.  Film shrinks over time and will be damaged if run through a projector.   Oils from our fingers breakdown the cellulose in negatives. Tapes warp and curl and get caught up in recorder heads. Vintage collections can be particularly fragile and need special care.  

 What's in your collection?

  • Loose photos stored in old shoe boxes, plastic tubs or still in their developing envelopes

  • Scrapbooks - with photos & other materials - that are falling apart

  • Magnetic "sticky albums" from the 70's & 80"s made with chemicals that are ruining instead of protecting  the photos

  • Slides & negatives inherited from your parents, with no means of viewing them

  • Home movies & videos that you can't watch because you no longer have a projector, or video camera to view them with? 

  • Are most of these stored in your attic, basement or garage?